MADE Featured in Food & Wine

Jackson Hole, Wyoming
Jenn Rice

We've planned your cozy, beer-filled itinerary. 

JENN RICE 
January 30, 2018

A winter playground offering some of the best snowy activities in the country, Jackson Hole refers to the area between the Teton Mountain Range and the Gros Ventre Range in Wyoming, consisting of Jackson, Teton Village, Moran, Moose and a few other surrounding towns. Most visitors assume it’s the land of wild game and steaks the size of your face, and yes, those delicious proteins are abundant, but there’s another exciting food world to discover once you arrive.

It’s wise to plan a few high-impact winter activities on this trip, as we’ve got loads of eating in store. Here, check out everything you should devour, starting as soon as you land.

Day one.

You’ve landed at Jackson Hole Airport, the world’s coziest, happiest airport ever, as you’re promptly greeted with mimosas and OJ upon entering the baggage claim area. (Actually.) Grab your gear and bags and make your way to the Anvil Hotel in the town of Jackson, a former roadside motel-turned-boutique hotel. Quickly unpack, grab a complimentary Snake River Roasting Co. coffee from the hotel’s café and purchase a Pendleton poncho from the mercantile and be on your merry way.

Town is at your fingertips, so start with a warming bowl of Mama’s Midnight Ramen and a spiked Thai iced tea from Teton Tiger for lunch. From there many shops await, including CocoLove, where you’d be a fool not to order master chocolatier Oscar Ortega’s spicy Mexican hot chocolate, and definitely stop by New West Knifeworks for an amazing, chef-approved kitchen knife. Peruse town and pick up a few foodie souvenirs at MADE, Café Genevieve's Pig Candy, Persephone Bakery’s Nutella (even better than the real deal!), bronco coffee mugs, pint glasses and more. Cowboy Coffee Co. is just across the street, so score a few bags of the Original Cowboy Blend, too. And it wouldn’t be a proper trip to Jackson Hole without picking up a tub of pastry chef Chad Horton’s Cream + Sugar ice cream sandwiches and a bottle of bubbly to go fromBin 22—also a divine spot for Spanish tapas and exciting wines by the class.

Ice Cream Sandwiches at Bin 22 - courtesy Fine Dining Restaurant Group.jpg
Fine Dining Restaurant Group

 

It’s almost dinner and we’ve got two stellar options for you: a proper sit-down affair and a progressive apps eating tour.

Dinner option one.

Book a reservation at Glorietta, a trattoria housed inside the Anvil Hotel, for the town’s best Italian eats. The vibe is everything you’d expect: thoughtful tunes; a vibrant atmosphere that transports you to your favorite Brooklyn hideout; a wildly talented chef team in the kitchen (chef Mac Jarvis hailing from David Chang’s Las Vegas Momofuku outpost and sous chef Eddie Gomez); and a cocktail menu featuring classics with a tweak created by New York’s Death & Co.

GLORIETTA -pasta - Tuck Fauntleroy.jpg
Tuck Fauntleroy

 

Bring a herd and share everything: the grilled boquerone bruschetta with olive relish and chili oil is anchovy heaven, while Jarvis’ ricotta cavatelli with spicy sausage, brown butter and fried sage is like “fancy hamburger helper.” The chopped kale salad is unassuming but just right, and for starters, don’t miss the grilled artichoke and Mussels Glorietta (the wood-fired grill flavor will have you contemplating seconds). If you’re still hungry, the $120 Tomahawk steak with a side of goose fat potatoes with truffle cream is an instant crowdpleaser. Jarvis’ favorite dessert, zeppole topped with mascarpone and strawberry compote, are the best way to end this indulgent meal—naturally, with a glass of amaro in hand.

Dinner option two.

If decision-making is hard for you, here’s an epic apps and drinks tour through the town, starting with a famous homemade “S”-shaped pretzel filled with your favorite toppings from Sidewinders Tavern, a local watering hole where everyone knows your name (or will after a few pints). You can’t go wrong with the jalapeno, mozzarella and pepperoni combo, properly washed down with Melvin Brewing’s Killer Bees (an American blonde ale with honey). Rendezvous Bistro’s oyster happy hour features $2 oysters everyday from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m., but be sure to arrive on the earlier side or you may leave disappointed.

Next, move on to Town Square to tackle several more outstanding bites, like the unmissable steak tartare pizza at Snake River Grill; the waffle fries with blue cheese fondue and Prince Edward Island mussels in a bath of white wine, garlic and herbs at Trio; and the hummus menu at FIGS (think seven different kinds), alongside housemade puffy pita bread and a Lebanese Lemonade with vodka.

FIGS
Jenn Rice

 

Happy hour thrives here, so post up at White Buffalo Club from 5 to 6 p.m. for chef Joel Hammond’s delicious $10 In-N-Out Animal Style burger with a beer, or opt for the brand-new roasted bone marrow deal that’s paired with a sherry or sake luge taken straight from the bone afterwards. The Million Dollar Cowboy Steakhouse shouldn’t be missed, where select wines and well cocktails are half off from 8 to 9 p.m. You’ll need to coat your stomach with the foie gras toast or cowboy potato skins with BBQ oxtail before line-dancing upstairs at the iconic Million Dollar Cowboy Bar.

Day two.

Rise and shine, a snow-filled day of winter activities is in store, so grab another cup of free joe from the hotel’s café and head over to Sweet Cheeks Meats for whatever the hell they’re cooking up that day. The Sunnyside Swine and Royale wit Cheese (a savory, cheesy breakfast burger that you should pile high with their pickled accoutrement spread) is all the morning fuel you need. 

Skiing or not, a ride up the Bridger Gondola for lunch at Piste Mountain Bistro is a scenic treat. Order the confit duck wings, shrimp ceviche tostada and an Instagram-worthy crock of wild game chili (for the biscuits alone) to share with the table.

Après awaits and should be spent at Bar Enoteca, where you can order a thoughtful selection of wines by the glass and ridiculously good small plates. It’s hard to narrow it down, but your palate will approve of the rabbit rillettes, tomato bread, Brussels salad and chef Serge Smith’s super-fresh crudo of the day. Locals tip: If you can manage, walk over to Spur for an epic bacon-infused Bloody Mary and chef Kevin Humphreys’ 307 fries—complete with thick, braised elk gravy, a bounty of cheese and chives.

The Spur
Jenn Rice

 

We’re hoping you skied off some serious calories today, as dinner awaits at Old Yellowstone Garage, Teton Village’s newest eatery, and it’s best to bring it (your appetite, that is). An inventive thin crust pizza or two are in store (the Joseph "Joe Piney" Armone entails Brussels sprouts, pancetta, pine nuts, dates and homemade maple yogurt is sweet and savory in all the right ways) and so is chef Paulie O'Connor’s layered OYG lasagna bowl. Cheese lover’s will appreciate the Italian Dream, O’Connor’s truffle fondue rendition, and the winter salad with persimmons, dried figs, Thai basil, honey and house-pulled mozzarella—a not-so-filling option. For dessert, opt for a hot buttered rum or spiked Italian coffee with cream and gaze out the window at the Tetons.

Old Yellowstone Garage
Jenn Rice

 

If you’re able to move after this massive feast, head to neighboring town, Wilson, for a proper night out at the Stagecoach Bar, a Western bar with character that’s been around since the 1940s. Open until 9 p.m., Streetfood, inside the bar, serves global-inspired street food that’s perfect for soaking up too many whiskey shots. The chorizo cheese dip, fritters and Bibimbap are all satisfying options.

Day three.

Persephone Bakery, a French café run by a husband-and-wife team, is the place to go for a proper sit-down breakfast, if you get there early enough to score a table, that is. On the sweet side, milk toast, basically brioche doused in strawberries, sweet milk brulée and sea salt, is where it’s at. If ski pants no longer fit, the grain bowl, filled with quinoa, butternut squash, bison sausage, sweet potatoes, Brussel sprouts and pickled onions, is quite satisfying (and paleo). Locals tip: Download the bakery’s app and skip the sometimes-daunting line by placing coffee and pastry orders ahead of time.

Jackson might be small in size, but its breweries are gaining national attention, so the best way to spend the last few hours is sampling local beer. Snake River Brewing, Wyoming’s oldest brewery, is perfect for apps and a flight (Pako’s EYE-P-A, Jenny Lake Lager and Snow King Pale Ale are favorites). If your flight is later in the day, consider yourself lucky, as you now have time to pop by Roadhouse Brewing Co.’s new taproom to guzzle down a cold Family Vacation (an American blonde ale), Fuck Your Face (a cheeky, juicy, Imperial IPA) and many others. Melvin Brewing, one of the country’s fastest growing breweries, is located inside of Thai Me Up in town and makes a killer Mexican lager, Heyzeus, as well as many other lovely brews—plus, Thai food if you find yourself hungry after all of the above.


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